Create a SharePoint Timer Job

Create a Blank SharePoint project in Visual Studio.Enter your site url and validate.

Add a new class say, TestTimer.

All timers must inherit from the class, Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPJobDefinition. Following is the code sample for our TestTimer class.


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration;

namespace SharePointTimerSample
{
    class TestTimer : SPJobDefinition
    {
        public TestTimer()
            : base()
        {
        }

        public TestTimer(string jobName, SPService service, SPServer server, SPJobLockType targetType)
            : base(jobName, service, server, targetType)
        {
        }

        public TestTimer(string jobName, SPWebApplication webApplication)
            : base(jobName, webApplication, null, SPJobLockType.Job)
        {
            this.Title = "My Test Timer Job";
        }

        protected override bool HasAdditionalUpdateAccess()
        {
            return true;
        }

        public override void Execute(Guid contentDbId)
        {
            //Write your main code here
        }
    }
}

The main functionality of our Timer job has to be laid down in the “Execute” method. It is this method, which will get called periodically by the timer after the completion of its given time interval.

Now, add a new Feature to your project.

Set the scope of the timer as per your requirement. Here, we’re going to set its scope to the site level. You can also set the name of your timer job here. Plz note that this is the name that will be displayed under the SiteCollection features option and is not the name of your wsp. The wsp’s name is going to be the name of your project.

Add a EventReceiver to our newly created Feature.

It is at the EventReceiver, we define the activities that needs to be performed while activating or deactivating the timer job. Even the time interval is also defined here.


using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Security.Permissions;
using Microsoft.SharePoint;
using Microsoft.SharePoint.Security;

namespace SharePointTimerSample.Features.Feature1
{
    /// 
    /// This class handles events raised during feature activation, deactivation, installation, uninstallation, and upgrade.
    /// 
    /// 
    /// The GUID attached to this class may be used during packaging and should not be modified.
    /// 

    [Guid("e61e62e9-5b30-4c8b-ad03-402056f835e3")]
    public class Feature1EventReceiver : SPFeatureReceiver
    {
        // Uncomment the method below to handle the event raised after a feature has been activated.

        public override void FeatureActivated(SPFeatureReceiverProperties properties)
        {
            SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(delegate()
            {
                SPSite site = properties.Feature.Parent as SPSite;
                int userid = site.RootWeb.CurrentUser.ID;

                // make sure the job isn't already registered  
                site.WebApplication.JobDefinitions.Where(t => t.Name.Equals("List_JOB_NAME")).ToList().ForEach(j => j.Delete());

                // install the job  
                TestTimer listLoggerJob = new TestTimer("List_JOB_NAME", site.WebApplication);

                //SPDailySchedule schedule = new SPDailySchedule();
                //schedule.BeginHour = 17;
                //schedule.BeginMinute = 0;
                //schedule.BeginSecond = 0;
                //schedule.EndSecond = 59;
                //schedule.EndMinute = 59;
                //schedule.EndHour = 0;
 
                SPMinuteSchedule schedule = new SPMinuteSchedule();
                schedule.BeginSecond = 0;
                schedule.EndSecond = 59;
                schedule.Interval = 5;
                
                listLoggerJob.Schedule = schedule;
                listLoggerJob.Update();
            });
        }


        // Uncomment the method below to handle the event raised before a feature is deactivated.

        public override void FeatureDeactivating(SPFeatureReceiverProperties properties)
        {
            SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(delegate()
            {
                SPSite site = properties.Feature.Parent as SPSite;

                // delete the job  
                site.WebApplication.JobDefinitions.Where(t => t.Name.Equals("List_JOB_NAME")).ToList().ForEach(j => j.Delete());
            });
        }


        // Uncomment the method below to handle the event raised after a feature has been installed.

        //public override void FeatureInstalled(SPFeatureReceiverProperties properties)
        //{
        //}


        // Uncomment the method below to handle the event raised before a feature is uninstalled.

        //public override void FeatureUninstalling(SPFeatureReceiverProperties properties)
        //{
        //}

        // Uncomment the method below to handle the event raised when a feature is upgrading.

        //public override void FeatureUpgrading(SPFeatureReceiverProperties properties, string upgradeActionName, System.Collections.Generic.IDictionary parameters)
        //{
        //}
    }
}

Finally, select your Feature in the Solution Explorer, and change, “Activate On Default” to False and “Always Force Install” to True.

That’s it. Next, deploy your solution and activate the feature from the “Site Collection features” option of your site. [As we set the scope to Site level.]

Get Available PowerShell Commands for SharePoint on Client-Side

Needless to say, that on Client Side, we get a limited scope of running various SharePoint commands. As a result there aren’t much cmdlets for the Client Side. So how do you know what are the available commands that might come handy while executing cmdlets remotely? Simply run the following command in PowerShell or SharePoint Online Management Shell.
get-command | Where-Object { $_.ModuleName -eq "Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.PowerShell" }

A sample list of available cmdlets are displayed in the following screenShot.

Share a SharePoint File with different Office365 users using Client Object Model C#

In my previous post, Get a list of all the Shared users for a ListItem/Document of SharePoint List, I had described how to get the list of all the SharePoint users with whom a given Document Library item, has been shared. Now, in this post, I am going to Share an existing ListItem with a different SP user using CSOM.This works in the following 2 simple steps:

  1. Get the user(principal) with whom the item has to be shared.
  2. Next, get/create the RoleDefinition which will have various Permission Rights for the user.

The 2nd point is important. SP has already defined various RoleDefinitions that we can use for our purpose like, Administrator, ContentEditior, Read, etc. So we can either use any one of them or can even create our own custom RoleDefinition. I am going to demonstrate both the functionalities here.

First get the User and the ListItem which is to be shared


ClientContext ctx = new ClientContext("targetURL");
ctx.Credentials = new SharePointOnlineCredentials(userName, passWord);

ctx.Load(ctx.Web);
SP.ListCollection listCol = web.Lists;
ctx.Load(listCol);

SP.List list = listCollection.GetByTitle("ListTitle");

SP.CamlQuery camlQuery = new SP.CamlQuery();
camlQuery.ViewXml = "";

SP.ListItemCollection listItemCollection = list.GetItems(camlQuery);
ctx.Load(listItemCollection);

ctx.ExecuteQuery();

//get the user you want to share the current item
User currentUser = ctx.Web.EnsureWeb("memberLoginName")
SP.ListItem listItem = listItemCollection.FirstOrDefault(t => t.DisplayName == "WordFile");
ctx.Load(listItem,
    li => li.HasUniqueRoleAssignments,
    li => li.RoleAssignments.Include(
        p => p.Member,
        p => p.RoleDefinitionBindings.Include(
            s => s.Name)));
ctx.Load(currentUser);
            
ctx.ExecuteQuery(); 

Share with User with Existing RoleDefinition

RoleDefinitionCollection roleDefCol = ctx.Web.RoleDefinitions;

ctx.Load(roleDefCol, r => r.Include(p => p.Name));
ctx.ExecuteQuery();

RoleDefinitionBindingCollection rDefBindCol = new RoleDefinitionBindingCollection(ctx);

//Could be Edit, Read, Contribute, etc.
string roleDefName = "Edit";
RoleDefinition rDef = roleDefCol.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Name == roleDefName);

if(rDef != null)
{
    //Add the current binding to the seleted listItems RoleAssignments
    rDefBindCol.Add(rDef);
}

ctx.ExecuteQuery();

Console.WriteLine("SharePoint Role Assigned successfully.");

Share with User with new Custom RoleDefinition

Site collSite = ctx.Site;

// Set up permissions.
BasePermissions permissions = new BasePermissions();
permissions.Set(PermissionKind.ViewListItems);
permissions.Set(PermissionKind.AddListItems);
permissions.Set(PermissionKind.EditListItems);
permissions.Set(PermissionKind.DeleteListItems);

// Create a new role definition.
RoleDefinitionCreationInformation rdcInfo = new RoleDefinitionCreationInformation();
rdcInfo.Name = "Manage List Items";
rdcInfo.Description = "Allows a user to manage this list items";
rdcInfo.BasePermissions = permissions;
RoleDefinition roleDef = collSite.RootWeb.RoleDefinitions.Add(rdcInfo);

// Create a new RoleDefinitionBindingCollection object.
RoleDefinitionBindingCollection collRDB = new RoleDefinitionBindingCollection(ctx);
// Add the role to the collection.
collRDB.Add(roleDef);

// Break permissions so its permissions can be managed directly.
listItem.BreakRoleInheritance(true, false);

// Get the RoleAssignmentCollection for the target listItem.
RoleAssignmentCollection collRoleAssign = listItem.RoleAssignments;
// Add the user to the target listItem and assign the user to the new //RoleDefinitionBindingCollection.
RoleAssignment rollAssign = collRoleAssign.Add(currentUser, collRDB);

ctx.ExecuteQuery();

Console.WriteLine("Custom Role Assigned successfully."); 

Get a list of all the Shared users for a ListItem/Document of SharePoint List using Client Object Model C#

In SharePoint, users have the option to share a document or a folder with another user with either Read or Edit permissions. So you can have a document or may be a folder that you have shared with a person, or many person, or even a group. So now the endevaour is to get a list of all the users with whom a given document is shared with their corresponding permission levels.

To do this, we’re take the help of Role Assignment class.
SharePoint stores this information in the ListItem’s RoleAssignments property. So have a look at the following code:


ClientContext ctx = new ClientContext(targetURL);
ctx.Credentials = new SharePointOnlineCredentials(userName, passWord);

ctx.Load(ctx.Web);
SP.ListCollection listCol = web.Lists;
ctx.Load(listCol);

SP.List list = listCollection.GetByTitle("ListTitle");

SP.CamlQuery camlQuery = new SP.CamlQuery();
camlQuery.ViewXml = "";

SP.ListItemCollection listItemCollection = list.GetItems(camlQuery);
ctx.Load(listItemCollection);

//Execute Query 
ctx.ExecuteQuery();

 
SP.ListItem listItem = listItemCollection.FirstOrDefault(t => t.DisplayName == "WordFileName");

ctx.Load(listItem,
    li => li.HasUniqueRoleAssignments,
    li => li.RoleAssignments.Include(
        p => p.Member,
        p => p.RoleDefinitionBindings.Include(
            s => s.Name)));
ctx.ExecuteQuery();

if (listItem.HasUniqueRoleAssignments)
{
    //Get all the RoleAssignments for this document
    foreach (RoleAssignment rAssignment in listItem.RoleAssignments)
    {
        //A single RA can have multiple bindings
        foreach (RoleDefinition rDef in rAssignment.RoleDefinitionBindings)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(String.Concat("Role assigned to the member, ", rAssignment.Member.LoginName, " is ", rDef.Name));
        }
    }
}
else
    Console.WriteLine("The current ListItem has no unique roles assigned to it.");

Here, what I am doing is that for a given SharePoint site, I am connecting to a Document Library named, “ListTitle”. Then I am trying to get an item, “WordFileName”  from that list as this item has got some unique roles.

The important things to note down here is:

  1. A single item can have multiple Role Assignments i.e., different types of roles can be assigned to it. Say, a given user, A, might be assigned with “Edit” permission while another user, B, can have only “Read” permissions. Each of this variations will come down as a single Role Assignment(RA).
  2. A single Role Assignment can have multiple bindings.

Following are the roles defined for the user, that you can get for an item:

  • Full Control
  • Design
  • Edit
  • Contribute
  • Read
  • Limited Access
  • View Only
  • Records Center Web Service Submitters

The above List may vary if there are some custom Role Definitions.

You might want to have a look about the Limited Access permission here, https://realmpksharepoint.wordpress.com/2014/07/29/you-cannot-grant-a-user-the-limited-access-permission-level/

Similarly, here’s the link to the blog where I have described how, through code, we can share Office365 file, https://realmpksharepoint.wordpress.com/2014/08/04/share-a-sharepoint-file-with-different-office365-users-using-client-object-model-c/
That’s it.

You cannot grant a user the Limited Access permission level

This is the error message I received when trying to assign a ListItem (Word Document), Limited Access permission.

To get a grip on this, first take a look at the following table. The table illustrates a list of all the Permission Level in Windows SharePoint Services 3.0

PERMISSION LEVEL DESCRIPTION
Full Control This permission level contains all permissions. Assigned to the Site name Owners SharePoint group, by default. This permission level cannot be customized or deleted.
Design Can create lists and document libraries, edit pages and apply themes, borders, and style sheets in the Web site. Not assigned to any SharePoint group, by default.
Contribute Can add, edit, and delete items in existing lists and document libraries. Assigned to the Site name Members SharePoint group, by default.
Read Read-only access to the Web site. Users and SharePoint groups with this permission level can view items and pages, open items, and documents. Assigned to the Site name Visitors SharePoint group, by default.
Limited Access The Limited Access permission level is designed to be combined with fine-grained permissions to give users access to a specific list, document library, item, or document, without giving them access to the entire site. However, to access a list or library, for example, a user must have permission to open the parent Web site and read shared data such as the theme and navigation bars of the Web site. The Limited Access permission level cannot be customized or deleted.

NOTE You cannot assign this permission level to users or SharePoint groups. Instead, Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 automatically assigns this permission level to users and SharePoint groups when you grant them access to an object on your site that requires that they have access to a higher level object on which they do not have permissions. For example, if you grant users access to an item in a list and they do not have access to the list itself, Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 automatically grants them Limited Access on the list, and also the site, if needed.

Now, I was trying to assign, from C# code, using Client Object Model, various Roles, to a user, like,

  • Read-Only,
  • Editor,
  • Contributor,
  • Administrator, &
  • Limited Access.

As it turns out, this permission level, Limited Access, is for SharePoint’s internal use only. So basically, we don’t have to be bothered about this.

There is a complete article about this on MSDN,  http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-sharepoint-services-help/permission-levels-and-permissions-HA010100149.aspx